Asian Dating – Umpalazi http://umpalazi.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 14:22:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://umpalazi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Asian Dating – Umpalazi http://umpalazi.org/ 32 32 $161.5 million interim settlement reached in opioid trial https://umpalazi.org/161-5-million-interim-settlement-reached-in-opioid-trial/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:30:42 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/161-5-million-interim-settlement-reached-in-opioid-trial/ CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Lawyers for the state of West Virginia and two other pharmaceutical companies have reached an interim settlement of $161.5 million just as final arguments were set to begin in a seven-week trial over the opioid epidemic, the attorney general said. Patrick Morrisey said Wednesday. Morrisey announced the development in court in […]]]>

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Lawyers for the state of West Virginia and two other pharmaceutical companies have reached an interim settlement of $161.5 million just as final arguments were set to begin in a seven-week trial over the opioid epidemic, the attorney general said. Patrick Morrisey said Wednesday.

Morrisey announced the development in court in the state’s lawsuit against Teva Pharmaceuticals Inc., AbbVie’s Allergan and their family of companies. The judge agreed to suspend the trial to give the parties an opportunity to reach a full settlement agreement in the coming weeks.


“We’re very optimistic about our ability to do that,” Morrisey said.

The trial began on April 4. The lawsuit accused the defendants of downplaying the addictive risks associated with opioid use while exaggerating the benefits.

Under the tentative deal, West Virginia would receive more than $134.5 million in cash, while Teva would provide the state with $27 million worth of Narcan, a drug that can reverse opioid overdoses. , restore breathing and bring someone back to consciousness.

West Virginia had reached a $99 million settlement last month with drugmaker Johnson & Johnson’s subsidiary, Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc., over the drugmaker’s role in perpetuating the opioid crisis in the US. A condition that has long led the country to drug overdose deaths.

Before the trial began, Morrisey’s office announced that the state had settled part of the lawsuit involving another defendant, Endo Health Solutions, for $26 million.

After years of lawsuits, drugmakers, distribution companies and some pharmacies have settled cases over opioid tolls.

In deals finalized this year, the three largest distribution companies and drugmaker Johnson & Johnson agreed to settlements totaling $26 billion over time. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is in court trying to win approval for a nationwide settlement including up to $6 billion in cash, as well as the use of future profits from a remade version of society to fight the opioid crisis.

In other settlements this year, distributors agreed to pay Washington State, which did not participate in the national settlement with them, more than $500 million, and a group of companies is sending $276 million dollars in Alabama.

In total, proposed and finalized settlements, judgments and criminal penalties for opioids have reached more than $47 billion since 2007. Much of the money is only to be used to deal with the crisis, which has been linked to the deaths of more than 500,000 Americans in the past two decades. A relatively small portion of the settlement money — at least $750 million in the Purdue deal — is to be paid to individual victims and their survivors.

In Charleston, a separate lawsuit ended last summer in a federal lawsuit accusing AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson of fueling the opioid crisis in Cabell County and the city of Huntington. This judge did not indicate when he will rule.

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Charges laid against officers who pulled students from car https://umpalazi.org/charges-laid-against-officers-who-pulled-students-from-car/ Mon, 23 May 2022 22:24:19 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/charges-laid-against-officers-who-pulled-students-from-car/ ATLANTA (AP) — A prosecutor said Monday he would not prosecute Atlanta police officers involved in a May 2020 confrontation with two college students who were knocked unconscious by Tasers and pulled from a car while pinned down. in traffic caused by protests over the death of George Floyd. Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, two […]]]>

ATLANTA (AP) — A prosecutor said Monday he would not prosecute Atlanta police officers involved in a May 2020 confrontation with two college students who were knocked unconscious by Tasers and pulled from a car while pinned down. in traffic caused by protests over the death of George Floyd.

Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, two students at historically black colleges in Atlanta, were confronted by police in downtown Atlanta on May 30, 2020. Within days, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard said announced that arrest warrants had been obtained for six officers.

“Not only did law enforcement act within their legal authority in their actions to achieve compliance, but their actions were also largely consistent with the Atlanta Police Department’s Use of Force Policy,” Cherokee Judicial Circuit District Attorney Samir Patel said in a statement. Monday.

Patel rejected warrants filed against the officers involved: Ivory Streeter, Mark Gardner, Lonnie Hood, Roland Claud, Willie Sauls and Armon Jones. He said he was “unable to find probable cause to prosecute the officers involved for a crime under Georgia law.”

Lawyers L. Chris Stewart, Justin Miller and Mawuli Davis, who represent Pilgrim and Young, said the two youngsters were “incredibly disappointed and discouraged” by Patel’s decision to dismiss the charges.


“The world has witnessed the outrageous and unjustified level of violence perpetrated against these students. How can a broken arm and 25 stitches be considered the appropriate response for an alleged curfew violation?” the attorneys said in an emailed statement.

State Attorney General Chris Carr in July named Patel to take over the case after Howard lost his re-election bid in November 2020 and his successor said Howard’s actions made management inappropriate. of the case by his office.

Video of the confrontation quickly circulated online. The day after the incident, then-Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and then-Police Chief Erika Shields announced that two officers had been fired and three others placed on desk duty.

They said at the time that they reviewed police body camera footage before making their decision. After this review, Bottoms said, “The use of excessive force is never okay.” Shields called the footage “really shocking to watch”.

Police released the body camera video the night after the confrontation.

It shows police arresting another young man on a downtown street next to a line of stopped cars. The man begs the police to let him go, claiming he did nothing.

Sitting in the driver’s seat of a car stopped on the street, Young raises his phone, appearing to shoot video as an officer approaches and opens the driver’s side door. Young closes the door and urges the officers to release the other man and let him into the car as the darkened sedan drives forward a bit.

The car is stuck in traffic and officers run to both sides of the car shouting orders. An officer uses a stun gun on Pilgrim as she tries to get out of the car, then officers pull her out of the vehicle.

Another officer yells at Young to park the car and open the window. One officer repeatedly hits the driver’s side window with a baton, and another finally manages to break it.

As the glass shatters, an officer uses a stun gun on Young and officers pull him from the car, some shouting, “Get your hand out of your pockets” and “He has a gun. He has a gun. He has a gun. After Young is out of the car and on the ground, officers tie his hands behind his back and take him away.

Police reports do not indicate that a firearm was recovered.

At a press conference two days later, Pilgrim said that she and Young “felt like we were going to die in that car.”

Patel’s statement said the video that was distributed after the incident “was not an accurate depiction of the entire encounter between Mr. Young, Ms. Pilgrim and law enforcement.” It was not immediately clear whether these were the first videos that circulated online or the body camera video.

The evidence shows that the two students violated a curfew put in place due to the protests, and that “the officers’ use of force was a direct result of the officers’ resistance and failure to follow the officers’ instructions.” Mr. Young and Mrs. Pilgrim,” the statement read. said. It also shows “the use of the Taser, and indeed any force used by the officers ended immediately once Mr. Young and Ms. Pilgrim were subdued.”

Streeter and Gardner were the officers who were fired. Their layoffs were reversed in February 2021 after the Atlanta Public Service Board found the city was not following its own personnel procedures.

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Swim from Asia to Europe through the mighty Bosphorus River https://umpalazi.org/swim-from-asia-to-europe-through-the-mighty-bosphorus-river/ Sun, 22 May 2022 05:00:13 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/swim-from-asia-to-europe-through-the-mighty-bosphorus-river/ You know you are in a really old place when the “new” mosque is from the 16th century. Istanbul’s old city has 8,000 years of history behind it, along which weaves the gargantuan kilometer-wide Bosphorus: the only river that separates two continents. The mainly residential and newer Asian side contrasts sharply with the economic, cultural […]]]>

You know you are in a really old place when the “new” mosque is from the 16th century. Istanbul’s old city has 8,000 years of history behind it, along which weaves the gargantuan kilometer-wide Bosphorus: the only river that separates two continents. The mainly residential and newer Asian side contrasts sharply with the economic, cultural and ancient heart of the old town, which teeters on the river strip on the European side.

And what better way to experience the dichotomy between old and new than to swim between the two sides? Yes, bathing. From Asia to Europe, descending 6.5 km of this venerable waterway, during the few hours each year when the navigation channel closes, it is possible to swim.

Since its inception in 1989, the Bosphorus Cross-Continental Swim has been organized by the Turkish Olympic Committee, but for hellish hope of participating in the annual event, I recommend booking through SwimTrek (swimtrek.com), a British tour operator specializing in open water swimming holidays around the world, who can also provide training times for long distance swimming events such as this.

I was nervous, but soon fell into a languid, soaring motion, allowing the river to do most of the work, passing ancient forts, towers and mansions on the west bank.

I can hear you asking yourself, “six and a half miles – are you off your rocker?” Two summers before, I had struggled to complete a 1.5km lake swim, which I wrote about in The Irish Times. But perseverance and training paid off, starting with swimming in the pool once a week, then in the sea two to three times a week from April until the race in August.

Technical

Once I mastered decent technique in open water, I found it surprisingly easy to gradually increase the distance from under 1km to over 4km. It was enough to get me through the Bosphorus swim; as you follow the course of this mighty river, the event is more like a standard 3.5-4km open water swim. And it was worth every shot over the previous six months.

Prior to the event, a flotilla of nearly naked swimmers are ferried 6.5km upstream to the eastern shore, where we plunge en masse into the warm waters, swimming back to the pier from which we started. The glorious madness of it all reminded me of those Serengeti documentaries of wildebeest migration, as they plunge off the steep banks.

I was nervous, but soon fell into a languid, soaring motion, letting the river do most of the work, passing old forts, towers and mansions on the west bank. With over 2,000 attendees you would think that would be shocking and yet there were times when I couldn’t see a single other swimmer. With the finish jetty close at hand, I realized how much I had left in the tank, which was duly emptied to cross the line.

Old town by day

Before and after the race we had a few days to explore. While Europe was, comparatively speaking, dragging its fingers through the mud between the 9th and 16th centuries, Islamic civilization was on the rise, as the Museum of Islamic Science and History of Technology shows. Housed in the former Imperial stables, in the dappled shade of Gulhane Park, it’s a perfect place to relax, picnic or people-watch under towering plane trees, just below the impressive Topkapi Palace. As the court of the Ottoman Empire between the 15th and 19th centuries, the palace served as the main residence of the Ottoman sultans and now houses a museum filled with jewels.

A 10-minute walk away is the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art, housed in a former 16th-century private palace within the Süleymaniye Mosque complex, and displaying rare examples from the Abbasid, Mamluk, Seljuk, and Ottoman periods. It also houses one of the best collections of carpets in the world, as well as glass, stone and terracotta objects.

Despite 2,400 race tickets each year, demand still outstrips supply

Located within the Blue Mosque complex is the Grand Palace Mosaic Museum, with exhibits dating back to the 5th century featuring scenes from daily life, nature and mythology. The most memorable mosaics include a lizard-eating griffin, a fight between an elephant and a lion, and children “weeding” a goose.

Istanbul’s compact old town is also a Romanesque maze of ornate cisterns. The Serefiye cistern recently underwent an eight-year restoration, accessible via a carpet shop (where else?). I still don’t know why the Romans poured so much money into these lavish underground pools that no one was supposed to visit, but we’re lucky they did. A certified Tureb guide, fluent in English, is well worth paying, costing between 100-200 TL (around €6.50-€13) for a six-hour day. Selcuk Eracun (seracun@yahoo.com) is the author of several books on Turkish history and an excellent guide.

Istanbul after dusk

During the 364 days when the Bosphorus is not closed to accommodate swimming, it sustains an entire industry. There’s buzz and bustle afloat, from rowing fishermen to passenger ferries; from showboat pleasure craft to giant tankers plowing through a watery wake of the Black Sea.

A fabulous way to get your bearings is to take a sunset cruise with bosphorustour.com. With a live guide on a modern yacht, the 2.5-hour (€50) tour includes complementary Turkish drinks (non-alcoholic), canapes and sliced ​​fruit to enjoy while floating near Dolmabahce Palace, the Ortakoy Mosque, Rumeli Fortress and Maiden’s Tower. Cruising south along the Asian side, you’ll see Baroque wooden mansions originally built as hunting lodges and country homes for Istanbul’s elite.

At around €50 for an hour performance, the Whirling Dervishes at the Hodjapasha Cultural Center are an expensive but worthwhile sight. Run by the Rumi Education and Culture Association and taking place in a renovated 15th-century building, the spectacle of the Mevlevi Order – twirling in cloaks from head to heels since 1273 – is a mesmerizing act in front of a small audience seated at the edge from the ring.

As you cannot leave Turkey without experiencing one of its famous hammam baths – the Kilic Ali Pasa Hamami (http://kilicalipasahamami.com) gets my vote. Housed in a domed 16th-century stone building, the hammam ritual lasts around an hour, costs 340 TL (€21) and includes exfoliation, foam and hair washing. Dressed in a towel, you can then relax on the sofas in the living room while you are served tea.

Then, wander through the lanes of the hammam along the semi-pedestrian Mumhane Caddesi road, with barely a tourist in sight. It’s where the locals come to play among restaurants and cafes, galleries and shops – visualize what Temple Bar could have been and you’re halfway there.

Jamie Ball was the guest of SwimTrek, Wilusa Tourist attractions and Turkish Airlines.

How

Despite 2,400 tickets to the race each year, demand still exceeds supply. Applications open in January through the Turkish Olympic Committee (bogazici.olimpiyatkomitesi.org.tr) and are usually complete within hours. Applying through an agent like SwimTrek greatly increases your chances of securing a place, but you will pay for this access: from €700 per person sharing, including entry and registration fees at the race, two nights of accommodation, airport transfers, and the race, and a dedicated, English-speaking SwimTrek guide staying at your hotel. Swimming takes place on Sunday morning, with race registration, briefing and boat tour of the course on Saturday morning. SwimTrek accepts applications starting in October. For the 2023 event, join the mailing list and start swimming!

Turkish Airlines flies from Dublin to Istanbul several times a week, from €310 return.

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North Korean spies create dating apps and spend money on nukes, FBI warns https://umpalazi.org/north-korean-spies-create-dating-apps-and-spend-money-on-nukes-fbi-warns/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:58:12 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/north-korean-spies-create-dating-apps-and-spend-money-on-nukes-fbi-warns/ Companies could run the risk of hiring North Korean secret agents when bringing in remote IT workers, US government officials have warned. According to the FBI, rogue North Korean freelancers are hiding their identities in order to make money for Kim Jong-Un’s nuclear weapons program and building everything from dating apps to online gambling. Computer […]]]>

Companies could run the risk of hiring North Korean secret agents when bringing in remote IT workers, US government officials have warned.

According to the FBI, rogue North Korean freelancers are hiding their identities in order to make money for Kim Jong-Un’s nuclear weapons program and building everything from dating apps to online gambling.

Computer scientists based mainly in China and Russia would pretend to be from South Korea, Japan and other Asian countries in order to obtain contracts and money from Western clients.

The US says most of the money it makes goes to the North Korean government, which urgently needs foreign currency.



US claims North Korean freelancers send money back to Kim Jong-Un’s regime

Officials said“There are thousands of DPRK IT workers both sent overseas and located in the DPRK, generating revenue that goes to the North Korean government.

“These IT professionals are taking advantage of existing demands for specific IT skills, such as software and mobile application development, to secure freelance work contracts with clients around the world, including North America, Europe and South Asia. ballast.”

Red flags to watch out for include refusals to participate in video calls and requests for payments in virtual currencies, such as Bitcoin.



FBI says series of IT companies have proven to be fronts for North Korea
FBI says series of IT companies have proven to be fronts for North Korea

Some of the workers are said to have even aided the North Korean government’s hacking operations, “could steal customer account information from US or international banks to verify their identity with independent platforms, payment providers, and companies employing” contractual.

The work of these freelancers includes creating mobile apps, dating apps, VR games, facial recognition, and more.

Part of the reason North Korean IT workers overseas act this way is that they can earn ‘at least ten times’ more than overseas factory workers or builders, a ‘significant percentage’ of their income supporting everything from the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program to labor.

It’s unclear how widespread the problem is, but the briefing notes that a US-sanctioned “Chinese computer company” in 2018 was actually run by North Korea.

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CAAMFest 40 Review – Beyond Chron https://umpalazi.org/caamfest-40-review-beyond-chron/ Mon, 16 May 2022 15:35:32 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/caamfest-40-review-beyond-chron/ Tina Takemoto’s experimental short “Ever Wanting (For Margaret Chung)” unearths a forgotten piece of Asian-American and LGBTQ+ history. Margaret Chung, for those unfamiliar with the name, was the first Chinese-American female doctor and founder of the first Western medical clinic in San Francisco Chinatown. Historical evidence also suggests that Chung was a lesbian. The metaphor […]]]>

Tina Takemoto’s experimental short “Ever Wanting (For Margaret Chung)” unearths a forgotten piece of Asian-American and LGBTQ+ history. Margaret Chung, for those unfamiliar with the name, was the first Chinese-American female doctor and founder of the first Western medical clinic in San Francisco Chinatown. Historical evidence also suggests that Chung was a lesbian.

The metaphor and allusion meld with elements of Chung’s life throughout the duration of the short. The birds flying in the sky appear to be metaphors for the big dreams Chung had for his life despite societal sexism and racism. Images of vintage surgical equipment refer to the fact that Chung trained as a surgeon (but never became chief of surgery at the Chinese Hospital in San Francisco). Footage of an airplane with a painted tiger nose and a group of women performing military drills captures Chung’s recruiting pilots for the famed Flying Tigers unit and his lobbying for the creation of the WAVES (the reserve corps of women in the US Navy).

But the emotions aroused by Kadet Kuhne and Edward J. Avila’s music for Takemoto’s film are far from celebratory. There is a sense of the growing social and psychological pressures of the World War II period. Chung’s subsequent drug addiction, alluded to in images of opium being heated on a spoon, therefore comes as no surprise.

In an interesting twist, footage of a nightclub singer’s performance merges with the film’s soundtrack to hint at the tension of the subject matter of Takemoto keeping his relationships very close and intimate with women private. While in some circles Chung’s lesbianism was an open secret, the doctor never publicly acknowledged her sexual feelings towards women for fear that she would be publicly labeled a deviant. That said, many of the notes and letters Chung exchanged with blues singer Sophie Tucker are written in language that suggests describing their relationship with the phrase “close friendship” is a serious understatement.

“Ever Wanting” is a short film that rewards viewing and a little post-movie research to find out the details of Chung’s life. It also couldn’t hurt to hope that Frameline will also include Takemoto’s short in its upcoming film festival.

***

There are certainly sympathetic elements in the documentary short “Elvis Of Laos”. Director Van Ditthavong delivers harrowing memories of his emotionally costly escape from Laos during the covert war waged against him by American forces. Little Kaila Ong is cuter than the proverbial pair of bug ears as she practices singing and teaches her grandpa some dance moves.

But the heart of the film turns out to be Voradeth Ditthavong, aka Kaila’s grandfather and the director’s father. He is the titular subject of the short documentary. The appellation comes from its groundbreaking Lao pop music with a mix of adult contemporary, edgy folk and Elvis Presley influence.

The last part is particularly noteworthy given that Voradeth didn’t understand English when he first heard an Elvis song. However, the rhythm and pace of Presley’s songs overcame the language barrier problem. Since Voradeth came from a musical family, he incorporated the beats and beats of Elvis into the songs he wrote. Lao high school and college students turned to Voradeth’s songs because they offered something new and different musically. This popularity eventually resulted in the main subject of the film becoming the godfather of Lao music.

Voradeth, as seen in the film, is unafraid of his musical fame remaining within the borders of Laos. In America, he is apparently content to be a 77-year-old working musician playing weddings and community halls. A little more public recognition wouldn’t hurt, though.

The problems with Van Ditthavong’s film begin at this point. The sequences between Kaila and Voradeth are sweet, but they lack a strong enough relationship to the older man’s story. It doesn’t even feel like passing the creative torch to the next generation.

The director’s own story of his escape from Laos to find his father involves heartbreaking personal tragedy. Yet the retelling of this story occurs too late in the film. Moreover, no effort is made to show how the events of this escape affected the director’s relationship with his father, even in the short term.

But the biggest mistake of “Elvis Of Laos” is to neglect Voradeth’s musical heritage. The viewer never gets an idea of ​​how much of Voradeth’s music still exists and how much was lost due to the war. Nor does the viewer hear of contemporary Lao musicians who can explain why they still love Voradeth’s music enough to make remakes of his songs.

Van Ditthavong’s film may deserve props to introduce CAAM viewers to his father and his work. Still, it ends up feeling too half-baked to offer a truly satisfying cinematic portrayal.

***

CAAMFest Closing Night Film Alika Tengan’s “Every Day In Kaimuki” follows community radio DJ and skateboarder Naz preparing to leave the titular small Hawaiian town for the lights of New York…where is he?. Does Naz often procrastinate in skateboarding? Is artist girlfriend Sloane OK with the move? Will Naz’s cat steal in a trash bag because his human is a cheapskate? A languid musical soundtrack and images from Kaimuki’s life leave viewers spellbound. Discreet entertainment.

***

Crystal Kwok’s personal documentary “Blurring The Color Line” is the best kind of film on history. It starts with an intriguing question. In the journey to answer this question, intriguing but forgotten historical facts and details are revealed. Unexpected places are visited. Finally, viewers see for themselves the parallels between what has been revealed of past and recent historical phenomena.

The aforementioned question is “In the Jim Crow era south, which part of the bus did the Chinese people sit on: the black section or the white section?”

Kwok’s question is already blowing viewers’ minds because the usual mental image of this racially segregated region populates the stage with only blacks and whites. But history (both general and personal) shows that there were indeed Chinese in the Jim Crow South. The first came in 1870 to build the canals in Augusta, Georgia. But by the 1920s, enough Chinese families came to the area to achieve the critical mass needed to establish a merchant class. In 1927, Augusta, Georgia would have the largest concentration of these merchants in the region with 46 different stores. The running joke in Augusta’s black community was that there was a Chinese grocery store on every block.

The manager knows all this because her grandmother Pearl and the rest of her family eventually ran two such stores after moving to Augusta in 1927. Like other Chinese merchant families, they may have lived and worked close to the black community, but they were granted some of the fruits of white privilege. Thus, the answer to the question that begins Kwok’s investigations is “the white section”. This answer would also apply to getting to school, visiting department stores, and even which public water fountain to use.

Rather than a useful social perk, these “privileges” have proven to be emotionally toxic in the long run. They dissuaded the Chinese from making common cause with the blacks against the whites. Accepting these “privileges” meant accepting the existence of the social glass ceiling that said the Chinese could advance as far in Southern society but no further. More damningly, accepting the so-called honorary role of whites also meant instilling negative social attitudes towards blacks.

Kwok damningly shows that Chinese acceptance of racist Jim Crow attitudes was certainly not a case of a racially condescending image of innocent Chinese being corrupted by evil white racism. Colorism was unfortunately part of Chinese (and Asian) societies. For those unfamiliar with the term, the belief can be summarized as follows: “if you have pale skin, you are elite; having darker skin means you’re a peasant and probably not very smart. Jim Crow’s social segregation proved suited to colorist attitudes. Grandma Pearl’s family followed this system. The family moved from San Francisco to Augusta to improve their lives, not to join people at the bottom of the social ladder.

The relationship between Augusta’s Chinese merchants and their black clientele is shown by Kwok to be primarily one of economic exploitation. These merchants saw a better opportunity to make money by filling the economic void left by the end of the slave-era Commissars. Socially equal, non-economic relations between the Chinese and the surrounding black community were rare. Ironically, the ultimate reaping of the fruits of such a trading relationship would end the Augusta Chinese trading period.

And then there is accepted sexism. Women were to be married and have as many children as possible. The fact of marriage to someone from a good family mattered; whether that husband was decent or an abusive bully not so much. Kwok’s great-grandmother, Chan Woon, had ten other children besides Pearl. The pressure put on Chan’s body was worth it as it eventually produced a male heir.

In an environment where women had very little hope, what would have been considered social transgressions now appear as a welcome act of defiance. Grandma Pearl was able to escape her family by quietly saving a share of the store’s gross receipts for herself to fund her theft plans. Chinese women used to date white men just to get a taste of sexual exoticism before their arranged marriages with real Chinese husbands.

The genius of Kwok’s film is that it presents all of this forgotten history in the spirit of curiosity. The director is not interested in settling old social scores dating back decades. When she asks her great aunts and uncles as well as Black Augusta residents who lived through this period “How did it happen and why”, her ultimate goal is to encourage viewers to avoid repeating these mistakes and to do better in the future.

What happened to several Korean store owners operating in the black community during the Los Angeles Rebellion in 1992 could have been predicted by the eventual fate of Augusta’s Chinese grocery store owners. Kwok would certainly appreciate if this “easier to be wiser later” loop could be broken by future generations.

(“Ever Wanting (For Margeret Chung) screens as part of the Boundless shorts program. “Elvis Of Laos” screens as part of the New Journeys shorts program. Both shorts programs are streaming online via CAAMFest on demand until May 22, 2022.

“Every Day In Kaimuki” screens at 6:30 p.m. on May 22, 2022 at New Parkway TheaterOakland.

For more information on these films and to order tickets, go to here.)

Filed Under: Arts & Entertainment

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City Life Org – National Museum of Asian Art Reveals Hidden Stories of Ancient Korean Architecture in New Exhibit https://umpalazi.org/city-life-org-national-museum-of-asian-art-reveals-hidden-stories-of-ancient-korean-architecture-in-new-exhibit/ Fri, 13 May 2022 01:58:40 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/city-life-org-national-museum-of-asian-art-reveals-hidden-stories-of-ancient-korean-architecture-in-new-exhibit/ “Once Upon a Roof: Vanished Korean Architecture” will be on view from May 21 to October 30 For the first time in the United States, visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art can admire a remarkable collection of roof ridge ornaments that were fashionable in Korea more than 1,000 years ago. Called Chemistry […]]]>

“Once Upon a Roof: Vanished Korean Architecture” will be on view from May 21 to October 30

For the first time in the United States, visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art can admire a remarkable collection of roof ridge ornaments that were fashionable in Korea more than 1,000 years ago. Called Chemistry in Korean, these monumental elements crowned both ends of the main roof ridge of important buildings. In addition to protecting and beautifying the tops of buildings, they were believed to ward off evil. These ornaments are featured in “Once Upon a Roof: Vanished Korean Architecture” which opens at the museum on May 21.

“This exhibit gives us the rare opportunity to showcase Asian architecture within the walls of the museum,” said Chase F. Robinson, Museum Director Dame Jillian Sackler. “Although focusing on just one aspect of traditional buildings, the exhibition helps visitors understand the materials, engineering and philosophy behind the East Asian tradition, through the lens of Korea. We are grateful to our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for loaning us these impressive objects, allowing them to leave Korea for the first time.

As visitors explore the exhibit, they will learn why ceramic tile roofs are important elements of East Asian architecture: interlocking kiln-fired pieces created an impermeable cover to protect the less durable wooden materials that support and shape impressive structures like temple and palace halls. This construction practice, first developed in China, arrived in Korea in the 4th century. Throughout East Asia, similar building principles were used for religious and secular structures.

The exhibit begins with an introduction to traditional Korean architecture, including the materials and structural principles that contextualize roof elements within the overall design. Ancient depictions of buildings as well as a contemporary architectural model will help visitors understand the displayed artifacts that were unearthed from the sites of temples and palace halls dating from the Three Kingdoms (Baekje) and Unified Silla periods ago. over 1000 years.

“Although these tiles survived, their buildings did not,” said J. Keith Wilson, curator of the exhibit. “The exhibits were found on archaeological sites. Salvaged, repaired and restored, the examples featured in this exhibition illustrate the beauty, engineering and scale of a vanished architectural tradition.

As a follow-up to the exhibition, the National Museum of Asian Arts will host the webinar “Ancient Korean Architecture in Context” on July 26. Four scholars from Korea and the United States will participate in the webinar, which will focus on ancient Korean architecture and ceramics. tiles dating from the Three Kingdoms and Unified Silla periods. The webinar will also offer new perspectives on production techniques and conservation practices.

Once Upon a Rooftop: Lost Korean Architecture” will inaugurate a new suite of gallery spaces that will host temporary and long-term exhibitions. The first long-term exhibition to open will be “Ancient Yemen: Incense, Art and Commerce” on June 25. In early 2023, “The Art of Knowledge in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Himalayas” will open and complete the sequel. of galleries.

This exhibition is organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art and the National Museum of Korea and represents another collaborative project undertaken by the two museums. Support is provided by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea.

About the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art

The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art, are located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Committed to preserving, exhibiting and interpreting exemplary works of art, the museum houses collections exceptional collections of Asian art, with more than 45,000 objects dating from the Neolithic era to the present day. Famous and iconic objects come from China, Japan, Korea, South and Southeast Asia, the ancient Near East and the Islamic world. The Freer Gallery of Art also holds a significant group of American works of art dating largely from the late 19th century. It houses the world’s largest collection of various works by James McNeill Whistler, including the famous Peacock Room. The National Museum of Asian Art is dedicated to increasing understanding of the arts of Asia through a broad portfolio of exhibitions, publications, curatorial, research and education.

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Japan’s PM has asked the German leader to help remove the ‘comfort women’ statue in Berlin https://umpalazi.org/japans-pm-has-asked-the-german-leader-to-help-remove-the-comfort-women-statue-in-berlin/ Wed, 11 May 2022 10:21:37 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/japans-pm-has-asked-the-german-leader-to-help-remove-the-comfort-women-statue-in-berlin/ People gather around a statue symbolizing Korean “comfort women” forced to work in wartime Japanese military brothels, in Berlin, October 13, 2020. (Mainichi) TOKYO (Kyodo) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked German Chancellor Olaf Scholz for help in removing a statue in Berlin symbolizing Korean “comfort […]]]>






People gather around a statue symbolizing Korean “comfort women” forced to work in wartime Japanese military brothels, in Berlin, October 13, 2020. (Mainichi)

TOKYO (Kyodo) — Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has asked German Chancellor Olaf Scholz for help in removing a statue in Berlin symbolizing Korean “comfort women” in wartime Japanese military brothels, the government said on Wednesday. government spokesperson.

The request was made when Kishida and Scholz met in Tokyo in late April, Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirokazu Matsuno said, expressing the government’s disappointment at the statue’s continued presence after it was erected by a pro-civic group. Korean in 2020.

Relations between Japan and South Korea have been frayed over issues dating back to Japanese colonization of the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945, such as that of Korean women who were forced to work in wartime brothels for Japanese troops.

The statue in Berlin’s central district of Mitte was erected in September 2020 after local authorities approved the installation for a year. The approval was later extended for another year.

“The prime minister said it was extremely regrettable to see the comfort woman statue still standing and again asked for the cooperation of the German side,” Matsuno said at a press briefing without giving further details. .

“We will approach the various parties involved, tenaciously explain our government’s position and call for the rapid removal of the statue,” he said.

Scholz chose Japan as the first Asian nation to visit since becoming chancellor in December. He met with Kishida on April 28 to deepen security ties and discuss the crisis in Ukraine.

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Nazi group co-founder tells court he wants to ‘repatriate ethnic minorities and Jews’ https://umpalazi.org/nazi-group-co-founder-tells-court-he-wants-to-repatriate-ethnic-minorities-and-jews/ Mon, 09 May 2022 16:38:13 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/nazi-group-co-founder-tells-court-he-wants-to-repatriate-ethnic-minorities-and-jews/ The co-founder of a banned fascist group told a court that his political aim was to repatriate ethnic minorities and Jews from the UK “in line with the Conservative government’s Rwandan policy”. Alex Davies, 27, is accused of being a member of the outlawed organization National Action (NA) after it was banned on December 16, […]]]>

The co-founder of a banned fascist group told a court that his political aim was to repatriate ethnic minorities and Jews from the UK “in line with the Conservative government’s Rwandan policy”.

Alex Davies, 27, is accused of being a member of the outlawed organization National Action (NA) after it was banned on December 16, 2016. Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, told Winchester Crown Court that the UK government banned the group after he had “terrorized” cities across the country with his call for an “all-out race war.” Following the ban, Davies set up the ‘continuity’ group NS131, which represented National Socialist Anti-Capitalist Action and was itself later banned by the government, Mr Jameson said.

Davies told the court that NS131 was not created as a continuation of NA and had different purposes and processes. Asked by Mr Jameson whether ethnic minority repatriation would be enforced, he said: ‘It would be compulsory, I imagine. I imagine it would be run along the lines of the current Conservative government and its sending asylum seekers to Rwanda.

Read more court stories here

He said the deportation would not affect all ethnic minorities and Jews, adding: “There are some Jews who do essential work, just as there are blacks, Asians and ethnic minorities who do essential work. , and returning them would be tantamount to doing so. hurt ourselves.

He continued: “If we were to take power, our aim is to have a majority white Britain as it has more or less been for centuries. It’s only in the last 50/60/70 years that we’ve had massive immigration, that would be going back to the pre-WWII status quo.

Asked if he would repatriate Jewish families whose British heritage goes back “thousands of years”, he replied: “Yes, that’s how the repatriation would work”. Davies denied being a violent person and said the training camps he attended were not paramilitary-type training events.

He added that he quoted former BNP leader Nick Griffin when he messaged a potential recruit in April 2017 who said: “We have to be smart but ready to use well-directed boots and fists, if needed. No peace movement will go anywhere.

Davies said that after the ban he pledged to “advance the cause of National Socialism, not the cause of a continuity NA”. After proscription, all I care about is pursuing legal political activities.

He said he estimated he had known about “10 to 12” of the 30/40 members of NS131 already. Davies, of Swansea, denies being a member of a banned organization between December 17, 2016 and September 27, 2017. The trial is continuing.

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Chrishell Stause tackles the best photos with G Flip https://umpalazi.org/chrishell-stause-tackles-the-best-photos-with-g-flip/ Sat, 07 May 2022 19:30:02 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/chrishell-stause-tackles-the-best-photos-with-g-flip/ Chrishell Stause has sent in new photos of herself with partner G-Flip that revealed more than she let on. (Photo: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic) Chrishell Stause has said she has no plans to show off so much skin in new paparazzi photos with partner G-Flip – and would rather the photos were no longer available for viewing. the […]]]>

Chrishell Stause has sent in new photos of herself with partner G-Flip that revealed more than she let on. (Photo: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)

Chrishell Stause has said she has no plans to show off so much skin in new paparazzi photos with partner G-Flip – and would rather the photos were no longer available for viewing.

the sell sunset star, who recently shared that on the Netflix show’s reunion special, took to his Instagram Story on Friday to clear the air over recent paparazzi photos of the couple. In the photos, which were taken outside The Abbey in West Hollywood this week, Stause is seen in a black top that appears to be completely see-through.

Stause wrote that the transparent look was not an intentional choice.

“When I know I’m doing flash photography, I wear the right things underneath so the flash doesn’t show anything,” the real estate agent explained. “In person, without flash, my top showed nothing. »

She added that she “back and forth” about whether to respond to the comments because she knew it would bring more “attention” to the issue. She also said she had spent the day trying to get the photos removed from the internet, “unsuccessfully”.

“To everyone who took the time to comment or defend, I may not see it as I try to take the internet in small doses – but love it and thank you,” she said. for follow-up. “I hope each of you have the best day of your life.”

Stause, who was previously married to This Is Us star Justin Hartley and separated from sell sunsetby Jason Oppenheim in December 2021, gave fans a glimpse of what she called her “chaotic love story” in the sell sunset reunion special.

“It started because I was just going to be in their video,” Stause said of how she initially bonded with G Flip. “And it’s about this chaotic love story. I come from soap operas, I love to act. And with the work we have, I can’t always do it. At the beginning, of course, I was like yes, let’s do that.

She also teased that the new couple shared a kiss in the music video.

“It was so much fun, we had so much fun,” she added. “Not everyone will be ready for this, but I think it’s great. I think it’s amazing, the song is amazing.”

]]> Nikitaa’s ‘Bad Trip’ reflects the pain of leaving a toxic relationship https://umpalazi.org/nikitaas-bad-trip-reflects-the-pain-of-leaving-a-toxic-relationship/ Fri, 06 May 2022 09:12:49 +0000 https://umpalazi.org/nikitaas-bad-trip-reflects-the-pain-of-leaving-a-toxic-relationship/ Mumbai, May 6 (IANS): Independent singer-songwriter Nikitaa has released her new track “Bad Trip (Sitam)” in which she explores multilingual songwriting and creates a rich soundscape to reflect it. Musically, the song alternates pop elements with a dreamy 6/8 section. The lyrics capture the feeling of knowing and leaving someone who is troublesome. The […]]]>

Mumbai, May 6 (IANS): Independent singer-songwriter Nikitaa has released her new track “Bad Trip (Sitam)” in which she explores multilingual songwriting and creates a rich soundscape to reflect it.

Musically, the song alternates pop elements with a dreamy 6/8 section. The lyrics capture the feeling of knowing and leaving someone who is troublesome. The poetry reflects the vulnerability and pain of having such an experience.

Driven by a rhythmic bassline, the song is filled with moody, pulsating synths, woodwinds, Middle Eastern-inspired strings as well as percussion ranging from djembe to Middle Eastern and Indian drumming. The artist combines ethereal Pop/RnB with a South Asian soundscape to create a new genre she calls “Goddess Pop”.

Speaking about the song, Nikitaa said in a statement: “The song has a dark theme as its base – it started as a way to let off steam about the ups and downs of dating someone very toxic. Both on the sonically than lyrically, the song went through several transformations and eventually became that dating someone who is like that feels like a “bad trip” in itself, and that getting out of it is both empowering and extremely difficult. .”

The video, which was shot in Los Angeles, is directed by Alex Bar, known professionally as Trophy Boy. She added, “I wanted to create something catchy, catchy, powerful and yet emotional. I wanted the process of creating art from something so painful to be fun, still beautiful, and still a very good listening experience.”

“I also played the idea of ​​God as a woman, forgiveness and confessions in the verse and pre-chorus. I wrote the melody and lyrics myself, and co-produced the song with longtime collaborator Mukund Komanduri. I hope the audience resonates with it as much as I do and I look forward to hearing their feedback,” she concluded.

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